Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Medical Physics and Biophysics Rome, Italy - Hotel Holiday Inn Rome.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Richard L Morin

Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, USA

Keynote: Physics education in medical imaging

Time : 10:00 -10:50

OMICS International Medical Physics 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Richard L Morin photo
Biography:

Richard L Morin is currently working as a Professor in Mayo Medical School. He has received his PhD from the University of Oklahoma in Medical Physics. He is the Director of Physics in Radiology at the Mayo Clinic Florida. He is a former President and Chairman of the Board of the AAPM, Member ACR Board of Chancellors, ABR and ABII Trustee. He has received the Coolidge Gold Medal Award from the AAPM and Gold Medal Awards from the American Roentgen Ray Society, the American College of Radiology, the Florida Radiological Society and the RLI Leadership Luminary Award.

Abstract:

Physics education is important to Diagnostic Radiologists, Radiation Oncologists and Medical Physicists. The primary premise of specialization in Medicine is that an individual has more knowledge and experience than others without specialty training. Physics is important to the practice. Fundamental knowledge of the Physics and Engineering on which imaging and therapeutic technologies are based is truly important and a distinguishing factor for those who image or treat patients. Demonstrated experience in these areas must be required to ensure safety and quality of care. Knowing bits of knowledge does not make one an authority in any field, to become an expert requires special training and experience. This fundamental concept is often lost among those responsible for the regulation and the use of ionizing radiation in medicine. It is plainly obvious that simply knowing human anatomy does not qualify a person to interpret medical images. Electronic processing techniques can make objects appear or disappear. Technical knowledge of the acquisition methodology is necessary to accurately associate pathology with a particular image. In addition the ability to correctly identify artifacts or other “nonstandard” presentations is vital to accurate image interpretation. Practical application of the basic physics related to each modality provides the framework to accommodate such variation and avoid misinterpretation. It is for these reasons that Physics education is important to the Radiology community. It is vital that Physics education be not a recitation of factoids to pass an examination but rather woven into the clinical environment, so that it is apparent and understood that fundamental Physics is being applied in clinical imaging situations

Keynote Forum

Géza Ódor

Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary

Keynote: Critical dynamics on a large human open connectome network
OMICS International Medical Physics 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Géza Ódor photo
Biography:

Géza Ódor has completed his PhD from Eötvös Loránd University and Postdoctoral studies at CERN Geneva. He is a Scientific Advisor of MTA-MFA, a Research Institution of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He got Doctor of Science degree from the Academy of Sciences in 2004. He has published more than 78 papers in reputed journals and a book on Nonequilibrium Statistical Physics.

Abstract:

Extended numerical simulations of threshold models have been performed on a human brain network with N=836733 connected nodes available from the open connectome project. While in the case of simple spreading models like contact process, SIS or threshold model, a sharp discontinuous phase transition without any critical dynamics arises. Variable threshold models exhibit extended power-law scaling regions. This is attributed to fact that Griths effects, stemming from the topological or interaction heterogeneity of the network can become relevant if the input sensitivity of nodes is equalized. Non-universal power-law avalanche size and time distributions have been found with exponents agreeing with the values obtained in electrode experiments of the human brain. Power-law activity time dependences occur sub-critically in an extended control parameter space region without the assumption of self-organization. Probably the most important result of this study is that negative weights enable local sustained activity and promote strong rare-region effects without network fragmentation. Thus, connectomes with high graph dimensions can be subject to rare-region effects and can show measurable Griths effects. Another important observation is that power-laws may occur in a single network, without sample averaging, due to the modular topological structure. Effects of link directness, as well as the consequence of inhibitory connections are studied. Robustness with respect of random removal of links suggests that connectome generation errors do not modify the Griths effects qualitatively

OMICS International Medical Physics 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Trevor Fitz John photo
Biography:

Trevor Fitz John obtained MBBS from Newcastle upon Tyne UK in 1978 followed by First FRCR examination in 1984. He immigrated to New Zealand in 1986. In NZ he has been at the forefront of technological advances being in the leading wave of establishing CT, MRI, PACS and most recently PET/CT at Pacific Radiology. He is the
Chairman of Cyclotek Pharmaceuticals NZ which operates NZ’s only cyclotron. He has a keen interest in multimodality oncologic and neuro imaging

Abstract:

The need for a distributable F18 based PSMA agent in New Zealand. I will present the distribution routes for Melbourne and Wellington based cyclotrons and pharmacy. I will review the first ~200 cases in this retrospective cohort from referrals by Urologists and Radiation Oncology with relation to disease case mix, and correlation with PSA and other imaging including 3T MRI of primary disease and 18F PET/CT bone scanning and body CT of disseminated disease. A subset of comparison of PSMA imaging against multiparametric mainly 3T MRI will be included. Representative slides will highlight points of interest

  • Tomography | Latest Imaging Techniques | Radiation Oncology | Biomedical Physics | Radiology | Biophysics | Sports Science | Diagnostic Imaging | Nuclear Medicine | Radiation Therapy
Location: Rome, Italy
Biography:

M A Nezami is a Board Certified Physician graduated from USC and UCSF residencies and fellowship and trained in Integrative Cancer Therapy. He serves as Researcher and national and international Speaker, in Oncology and Epigenetic field. He has been involved in many research projects and publications/ presentations. He is an Inventor and Innovator and has designed a new method of treating advanced cancer, called Multi Molecular Targeted Epigenetic Therapy (MTET). With this method, over the last 7 years, he has successfully treated many patients, mostly with advanced cancer who had failed conventional methods

Abstract:

Patients with cancer are evaluated through different oncology laboratory markers, aiming at translation to clinical findings, both to evaluate progression of disease as well as translating to overall survival, as surrogate markers. This effort has been revolutionized as the traditional measurements of the tumor size in CT scans, and identifying cancer response by RECIST criteria, has failed to effectively translate into patient survival. Therefore establishing the prognosis in majority of patients, especially with heterogeneous tumors, has been extremely challenging. One area of most recent attention in identifying surrogate markers has been the vasculogenesis and its related serum markers. Different stages of carcinogenesis and metastasis is greatly dependent on tumor angiogenesis, as a result of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Novel ways to assess vascular function in cancer include measuring levels of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) or circulatory tumor cells (CTCs). The presence of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) has recently been recognized as a useful marker of vascular damage. That said, as of today, there is not a single biomarker used clinically for assessing vasculogenesis, or intratumoral hypoxia and the correlation between FDG-PET findings and survival has not been strong, especially in more heterogenous cancers (such as breast and lung cancer). Here we hypothesize that serum/plasma VEGF measurements, as a biomarker for vasculogenesis (and possible intratumoral hypoxia), before and after therapy independently, or in addition to, circulatory tumor cells assay, can be used as a prognostic marker correlating with FDG-PET findings. Altogether, it is a meaningful companion diagnostic tool to translate to clinical outcome, and overall survival. This is also important in therapeutic areas, as traditional chemotherapies in general (all anthracyclines, Alkylators, Platinum based chemotherapies, etc.) increase the serum circulatory tumor cells, as well as serum VEGF, by several mechanisms, including proinflammatory cytokines, disrupting the tumor vessels by disrupting endothelial dysfunction and causing tumor cell leaks. This necessitates new tools to overcome such negative measurable impact on potential survival. Accordingly, here, we present a summary of 150 cases of advanced disease and in detail, we present six cases of heterogenous stage four breast cancer who had failed several lines of chemotherapy, and were treated using anovel antiangiogenic therapy, consisting of natural and off label drugs. These are known to inhibit hypoxia induced pathways, in a protocol called multi targeted epigenetic therapy (MTET), resulting in independent and synergistic response identifiedby serum VEGF/CTC/ and FDG-PET combo findings, and translated to improved progression free, or overall survival. We conclude that this sample, although small, presents considerable effect size and can impact the current practice of oncology by providing better prognostic and therapeutic tools targeting angiogenesis in refractory heterogeneous disease

Carina Mari Aparici

University of California San Francisco, USA

Title: Real-time molecular probe-directed intraprocedural biopsies
Biography:

Carina Mari Aparici is an Associate Professor in Residence at UCSF. She is a Nuclear Physician with residencies in both Europe (Barcelona) and US (Stanford), and with Molecular imaging fellowships from Stanford University. She is a Physician-Scientist in the development of Molecular Imaging. She has about 20 yearsof clinical and research experience in the field, and 10 years of a leadership position as Chief Nuclear Medicine at the San Francisco VAMC as part of her faculty position at UCSF. She has published 100 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute

 

Abstract:

The clinical management of lesions suspicious for malignancy relies not only on diagnosis of benign versus malignant potential but also tumor grading, immunohistochemical and genetic information. Pathological analysis remains the gold standard for definite diagnosis. Hence, a carefully performed biopsy with low risk of complication is crucial. Compared to open biopsy, image-guided biopsies are minimally invasive and confer several advantages including low morbidity, low complication rate and cost savings. FDG-PET/CT has shown higher diagnostic accuracy than conventional imaging CT in characterizing tumor in initial staging, treatment response evaluation and follow-up. PET/CT guided biopsies may allow early histologic diagnosis and staging before morphologic changes are evident. PET/CT biopsy can therefore rule out/in malignancy in early stage of disease and re-stage different types of cancer. Non-real-time PET/CT biopsies have used the image co-registration of a prior PET with a intraprocedural CT. However, this method is inaccurate in time and space, takes long time and requires special software. The aim of this study is to report the initial experience of utilizing the real-time intraprocedural PET/CT guided biopsies, including feasibility and technical requirements

Biography:

Gregory G Passmore earned his PhD, MS and Certificate in Nuclear Medicine Technology from the University of Missouri. He is a Tenured Professor and the Director of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program at the Augusta University. His research interests include both Nuclear Imaging Physics and Nuclear Medicine Education. He has over 100 publications, abstracts and presentations combined

Abstract:

Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) camera imaging of myocardium perfusion is dependent upon maintaining usable geometry between the detector and the view of patient through the use of an attached lead (Pb) collimator. Both Tl-201 and Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals can indicate the perfusion characteristics of myocardium. Of the two, Tl-201 has the capability to differentiate between viable or scarred myocardium. Currently, SPECT dual-isotope, as well as singular isotope, myocardial imaging protocols require two scans. Simultaneous imaging of Tl-201 and Tc-99 m would have the benefits of eliminating potential errors caused by position misalignment between scans, significantly reducing the study time. In addition, simultaneous Tl-201/Tc-99m would provide optimal perfusion imaging and tissue viability signaling. This would further enhance the diagnostic ability of the modality, especially for those patients who are contraindicated for other functional imaging such as PET. However, the Pb collimator interacts with the Tc-99m 140 keV photon to create Compton down-scatter components and k-shell x-rays which interfere with imaging the ~70-80 keV Tl-201 photons. This down-scatter reduces image resolution and obscures Tl-201 defects, falsely indicating viable myocardium. Replacing the Pb collimator with the differing density and lower energy K-shell x-ray cross-section would potentially reduce the Tc-99m down-scatter photons in the Tl-201 photopeak range. The aim of the project was to test the ability of a tungsten (W) pinhole attenuator in reducing the detrimental effects of Pb generated down-scatter during simultaneous dual-isotope 201Tl/99mTc imaging through increased absorption and shifting the k-shell x-ray out of the Tl-201 photopeak. Outcomes indicate a significant reduction in down-scatter using W attenuators compared to Pb attenuators

 

Biography:

Mariusz Klimczyk has studied in Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, Department of Physical Education, Health and Tourism and has published many articles in the field of Sports and Physics Education. He has published more than 100 articles in reputed journals

Abstract:

Aim: The purpose of the study is to indicate the most accurate diagnostic factors of special fitness of athletes training pole vault aged 12 and prognostics for athletes aged 17.
 
Materials & Methods: Experimental studies conducted in 2001–2010 involved 22 athletes aged 12 and 11 athletes aged 17. Athletes participated in sports activities, training pole vault in the following clubs: “Gwardia” Piła, Gdańsk Pole Vault Center, TS “Olimpia” Poznań, SL WKS “Zawisza” Bydgoszcz, and “Śląsk” Wrocław. The studies included the method of teacher’s observation. Tools applied in the studies included assessment of physical fitness and sport results, conducted during the athletic season. Basic statistical methods were used for the analysis of study results.
 
Results & Conclusions: The author determined inter-relation of individual special fitness tests in 12 and 17-year-old athletes and correlation of these tests with pole vault results in the studied age category. It was indicated that in age category 12, diagnostic tests are performed, in which correlation with sport result ranges between -0.45 (15-meter run) to 0.71 (standing long jump). Their purpose is to determine basic parameters justifying continuation of pole vault athletic training. Seventeenyear- old pole vaulters undergo prognostic tests in which correlation with sport results ranges between 0.64 (shot put 4 kg thrown back over the head) to 0.94 (“flying” over the bar from a backward roll); their purpose is to predict development of an athlete within training, and ultimately – sport results

Samira Al-Salehi

Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE

Title: The impact of cone beam computed tomography on endodontics

Time : 15:40-16:05

Speaker
Biography:

Samira Al-Salehi graduated from Manchester University Dental School, UK. She was awarded PhD degree from Sheffield University, for her work on bleaching, where she received Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training (CCST). For a short time, she was Consultant at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry before taking up a Senior Lecturer/Honorary Consultant post at Manchester University Dental School. For the last 5 years, she has been working in Dubai. She is currently a Professor and Endodontic Program Director at Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine

Abstract:

The use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is rapidly increasing as it provides valuable 3D information of the area under investigation in a matter of minutes. The radiation dosage associated with CBCT images is, however, about an order of magnitude higher than that of conventional radiographic images. The dosage is still considered relatively small but due to the cumulative nature of radiation it is advisable that CBCT should be used only in cases where clinically indicated. 35 patients were selected, from primary care referrals to a specialist endodontic unit in a leading UK dental hospital, for a clinical study. Ethical approval was obtained from the appropriate UK body. For each patient, a dental and medical history, a color photographic intraoral image, parallax periapical radiographs and CBCT image data set were taken (case scenario). Observers were recruited to assess the data. One observer, subsequently, dropped out of the study and was not included in the results. A questionnaire was designed for the observers aimed to address parts III and IV of the Fryback and Thornbury model dealing with diagnostic thinking and treatment outcomes. The information for all the 35 patients was examined by the observers on two separate dates about 3 months apart. On one date, all the information was given to them but, on the other the CBCT images were withheld. The null hypothesis “there is no significant difference in treatment planning/outcome with or without CBCT images” was tested. The results showed that the availability of CBCT images made no significant difference to the observers’ judgment. In complex cases such as resorptive lesions, however, the availability of CBCT was very helpful in their diagnosis. It was concluded that CBCT images are vital for certain complex endodontic treatments but should not be used routinely for all endodontic cases

Asli Yazici

Onko Ankara Oncology Center, Turkey

Title: Intra fractional set-up measurements between EPID and CBCT
Biography:

Asli Yazici has completed her MD from Institute of Nuclear Science of Ankara University. She has been working in Onko Ankara Oncology Center since 2011 as a
Medical Physicist. She has performed treatment planning (IMRT-IGRT, conformal and complex techniques), daily-weekly-yearly QA’s of LINAC and patient QA’s in routine

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to evaluate three-dimensional set-up errors, systematic and random set-up errors between the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and CBCT to determine optimum planning target volume (PTV) coverage margins in our clinic. This study was performed on 25 cancer patients, treated with Siemens Artiste LINAC.EPID and CBCTprojections of set-up fields were acquired simultaneously for each patients. The systematic and random error for individual and population were calculated both portal imaging and CBCT protections. The standard deviations of systematic and random set-up errors were calculated both imaging techniques to determine CTV-PTV margins according to ICRU Report 62 recommendations, along wih Stroom’s and van Herk’s formulae. Linear regression analysis of the EPID setup data as a function of the CBCT data were performed. The paired t-test was used to evaluate whether the EPID setup data were significantly different from the CBCT setup data. Correlations between the setup difference between EPID and CBCT were tested with the Pearson correlation coefficient. According to portal imaging result, CTV to PTV margins were found less than CBCT projections results in consequence of the manuel reconstructions while using portal imaging. As compared to our traditional margin of 5 mm in our clinic, it seems that we can further increase DV direction of the CTV to PTV margin to ensure at least 95% dose to 99% of the CTV using Van Herk and Stroom equations. The regression coefficient ( ) for the LR, CC, and DV directions were 0.11 (95% confidence interval [CI]=(-0.323)-(0.648)), 0.01 (95% CI=(-0.349)-(0.495)) and 0.24 (95% CI=0.039-0.597), respectively

Biography:

Ahad Zeinli is the Head of Medical Physics Department, Urmia Medical Science University, Meysam Dadgar, Iran. He is also currently working as Associate Professor. He has completed his PhD from Tarbiat Modares University. He has many publications, abstracts and presentations combined. His research interests include both Medical Physics and Nuclear Medicine Education

Abstract:

The goal of this simulation study is to assess and compare Parallax error with different scintillator crystals in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). For this simulation study we use GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). The crystals which act as simulators in this study are LSO, GSO, BGO and LYSO. In this work we simulate PET scanner with two ring and hexagonal geometries. Full ring PET scanner which consists of 26 detectors block where each block consists of 96 crystal blocks. In each crystal block there are 25 crystals. For hexagonal geometry in each head we simulate 620 blocks, each one consist 25 crystals. In both the geometries, a cylindrical shaped pancreas phantom is used for this simulation. We set 350 KeV threshold and 750 KeV upholder. The coincidence window for both geometry is 10 nanoseconds. Also we evaluate effect of gantry rotation on parallax error. To extract parallax of each case, we analyze simulation output via ROOT Tree

Biography:

Abdoul Karim Mamadou Saidou has completed his Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from University of Hassan II Casablanca in Morocco and is currently enrolled in a PhD position in the same university. He is a Member of Spectroscopy and Dosimetry team, and his field of research is Medical/Radiation Physics and Dosimetry for Radiotherapy. He has attended many scientific meetings with publications in conference proceedings and journals

Abstract:

Radiotherapy treatment delivers low dose radiation beams to the patient to destroy the tumor with energy deposition in the matter. Thus it requires effective dosimetry for dose assessment in the clinical environment and the patient body. Among many dosimetric systems, EPR method is interesting with substantial advantages such as its reliability, accuracy and its non-destructive asset. In this proposed study, alanine irradiated by 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron beams delivered by a linear accelerator CLINAC 2300DHX was analyzed by EPR method to determine its dosimetric potentialities and compare the effect of energy. Samples were irradiated at doses ranging from 0 to 20Gy. EPR measurements performed with optimized parameters (microwave power = 1 mW, amplitude modulation = 0.5 mT) show a good radiation sensitivity of this material: threshold measurable dose is 1 Gy for both the energies of irradiation. Also the concentration of free radicals induced is proportional to the absorbed dose. Indeed, alanine is slightly more sensitive to 18 MeV beam than to 6 MeV beam. Furthermore, the free radicals created after irradiation are stable during 12 months of storage which allows multiple alanine dosimeter reading. Finally, a small quantity of alanine is efficient for pellets elaboration